‘It’s contagious:’ what you don’t experience on the couch

Fans cheer on the San Francisco Giants and the Milwaukee Brewers from the Coca-Cola Fan Lot. The Coca-Cola Bottle, 465 feet in length, houses the Coca-Cola Superslide, which includes viewing platforms and four slides.

Fans cheer on the San Francisco Giants and the Milwaukee Brewers from the Coca-Cola Fan Lot. The Coca-Cola Bottle, 465 feet in length, houses the Coca-Cola Superslide, which includes viewing platforms and four slides. Photo by Emily Durka

SAN FRANCISCO — Technology has developed at an exponential rate in the past few decades, and has been both beneficial and convenient. Most events are either recorded or broadcast live, and audiences around the world who can’t attend certain events are brought to the action through television and media.

However, there is a sentimentality that is experienced when one is present at such events.

“My favorite part about going to a live baseball game is the atmosphere,” said Dominic Carriooo, a Giants fan at the recent Giants-Brewers game on Wednesday night. “The fans get really into the game.”

The atmosphere of an event is the one thing that technology cannot fully translate on a screen: the cheering crowd, the baseball chants, the shouting of the food vendors who push their food products consistently. While a social gathering to watch the game may bring hype and laughter, the in-person experience is more memorable.

“It’s contagious: the energy,” Corina Zimmerman said. “I had to pay for it, but it’s worth it.”

Watching a live event may also bring nostalgia to those in the audience, and memories may begin to surface.

“I played baseball growing up,” Alex Coriano, a Giants fan who received free tickets from his company, said. “It reminds me of hanging out with my dad. I also like the social aspect of it.”

Despite the sentimentality that is lost, television has helped popularize sports with features such as instant replays, closeups of the athletes and exclusive interviews that couldn’t be heard over the roar of the crow. Colorful fans can be seen more clearly, and the pre-game shows give us more background on the atheletes who we are watching.

“It’s cool to be here and hear everyone cheering. It’s fun,” Erin Langan said.